Effectively Wild Episode 1443: Managing, Fast and Slow

EWFI
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller break down the latest ALCS and NLCS action, touching on the Cardinals’ offensive outage, Mike Shildt’s old-school managing, the Nationals’ pitching, the Astros’ purported pitch-tipping and sign-stealing, Aaron Boone’s quick hooks, and the de-juiced ball, plus a Stat Blast about this October’s anomalous bullpen usage.

Audio intro: Neil Young, "Wolf Moon"
Audio outro: The Flaming Lips, "Hit Me Like You Did the First Time"

Link to story on Paxton’s pitch-tipping in April
Link to story on Paxton’s latest purported pitch-tipping
Link to post on pitcher usage and the home run rate
Link to story on Correa’s home run dedication
Link to order The MVP Machine

 iTunes Feed (Please rate and review us!)
 Sponsor Us on Patreon
 Facebook Group
 Effectively Wild Wiki
 Twitter Account
 Get Our Merch!
 Email Us: podcast@fangraphs.com

We hoped you liked reading Effectively Wild Episode 1443: Managing, Fast and Slow by Ben Lindbergh!

Please support FanGraphs by becoming a member. We publish thousands of articles a year, host multiple podcasts, and have an ever growing database of baseball stats.

FanGraphs does not have a paywall. With your membership, we can continue to offer the content you've come to rely on and add to our unique baseball coverage.

Support FanGraphs




newest oldest most voted
Joser
Member
Joser

So the bullpen strategy Sam suggests — use your best reliever first for as long as he’s your best, and then move on to the next-best — is kind of the “Opener” mindset applied to relievers. In the same way the “Opener” turns the “Starter+middle-innings-relief+closer” on its head, this essentially does that to the string of relievers after your starter. And so, like the “Opener,” it’s not surprising the team implementing it is the Rays.