Cardinals Add Stephen Piscotty to Their Lineup

It’s no secret that the St. Louis Cardinals have a pretty good team this year. Their 59-34 record is easily the best in baseball, as are their 98.8% playoff odds. Yet, for all that’s right with the Cardinals, there’s been one gaping hole in their lineup of late: first base.

Since Matt Adams‘ season came to an end when he tore his quad in late May, the Cardinals have had a tough time filling the he left void at first base. Most of the plate appearances have fallen to Mark Reynolds, who’s managed just an unspectacular 95 wRC+ from the position. Xavier Scruggs and Dan Johnson have also kicked in a combined 46 plate appearances of sub-80 wRC+ work.

To help sure up their first-base situation, the Cards called up prospect Stephen Piscotty, who was hitting a strong .272/.366/.475 in Triple-A Memphis. Although the Cardinals have mostly deployed him as an outfielder in the minors, the plan appears to be for him to slot in at first base for the time being. Unlike many of the guys who have gotten the call over the past couple of months, Piscotty’s not a consensus top-tier prospect. Although he did manage to crack the top 50 in both Baseball Prospectus’ and John Sickels’ mid-season lists. Our very own Kiley McDaniel had him 81st in the preseason.

Piscotty’s been an intriguing offensive prospect for a few years now. The Cardinals took him with the 36th overall pick from Stanford in 2012, and he immediately began to prove his mettle in the low minors. He closed out his draft year by hitting .295/.376/.448 in the Low-A Midwest League, on the strength of modest power and an excellent 11% strikeout rate. He performed similarly the following year, splitting time between High-A and Double-A. Once again, he struck out in a mere 10% of his plate appearances, and sprinkled in a bit of power. He also complemented his .295/.355/.464 batting linewith decent speed by swiping 11 bases in his age-22 campaign.

Piscotty opened 2014 at the Triple-A level, and many expected he’d find his way onto the Cardinals roster by year’s end. He never got the call, however, as Piscotty’s bat sputtered in his first taste of Triple-A. He made his usual amount of contact, but stopped hitting the ball with any sort of authority. He posted an isolated power of .118, down from .152 and .169 in his first two seasons. Piscotty’s .288/.355/.406 batting line looked good at first glance, but was merely average fot the hitter-friendly the Pacific Coast League. Not very exciting coming from a corner outfielder. As a result, the Cardinals passed over Piscotty for Randall Grichuk and the late Oscar Taveras when they needed outfield help last year.

Piscotty returned to Triple-A this season, where he rediscovered his power stroke — and then some. With 41 extra base hits, Piscotty matched his total from all of last season, despite playing less than two-thirds as many games. His .203 ISO is easily his best mark as a pro.


ISO

His power outburst has coincided with a spike in his walk rate. He’s walked in over 12% of his trips to the plate this season, compared to less than 8% last year. The increase likely had something to do with pitchers beginning to pitch him with caution given his newfound pop.

BB

Piscotty’s power surge wasn’t completely unexpected. At 6-3, 210 pounds, he always had a good deal of strength, which is why Kiley McDaniel pegged him for 55 raw power in the offseason. However, prior to this year, Piscotty had trouble getting that power into games. Despite his above-average raw power, Kiley slapped a 35 on his game power heading into the year. Still, he projected Piscotty for 50 in-game power down the road, which equates to 15-18 homers per year.

According to Kiley, Piscotty is incorporating a bit more loft in his swing path this year, which explains why his power is finally showing up in games. And according to Piscotty himself, this change hasn’t occurred by chance. It’s the result of a conscious effort to hit the ball with more authority, per a recent interview with Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post Dispatch:

“My goal for each game has really changed,” Piscotty said. “I was really bogged down with hitting for average and getting hits even if they were weak hits. Now, my focus is getting extra-base hits. There are going to be some more strikeouts and that’s part of hitting for power. But I’m piling up the walks. I can see hints of things coming together.”

Piscotty’s right that his power and walks have come with more strikeouts. His strikeout rate has ticked up from 11% to 17% between this year and last.

K

However, these strikeouts have been outweighed by the other changes, causing his wRC+ to improve from 100 to 125. Piscotty has improved, but he’s also grown a year older, causing his KATOH forecast to tick down from 3.9 to 3.5 WAR through age-28. As a result, he dropped from 113th to 130th in KATOH’s preseason rankings. But even after this slight downgrade, KATOH still thinks Piscotty’s an intriguing prospect.

It’s worth noting, however, that Piscotty’s improvements have also come with a substantial drop in his zone contact rate, which is often a bellwether for a smooth transition to the big leagues. He made contact on an impressive 90% of swings in the strike zone, according to Minor League Central. But as of June 18th of this year, when MLC stopped updating due to technical difficulties, his zone contact rate was just 78%. On average, a guy with a 90% contact rate (2014 Piscotty) can be expected to undershoot his Triple-A wOBA by .050 points, while a guy with a 78% clip (2015 Piscotty) will undershoot by closer to .075.

wOBA

Let’s get some comps up in here. Using league-adjusted, regressed stats, along with age, I calculated the Mahalanobis Distance between Piscotty’s performance and every Triple-A season since 1990 in which a batter recorded at least 400 plate appearances. Below, you’ll find a list of historical players whose performances were nearest and dearest to Piscotty’s, ranked from most to least similar.

Rank Mah Dist Name PA thru 28 WAR thru 28
1 0.34 Beau Allred 156 0.8
2 0.54 Jon Saffer 0 0.0
3 0.61 Bill Masse 0 0.0
4 0.70 Torey Lovullo 549 0.2
5 0.76 Yamaico Navarro* 199 0.0
6 0.77 Brad Nelson 31 0.0
7 0.83 Rob Ryan 70 0.0
8 0.96 Dan Johnson 1,289 2.5
9 0.97 Jeff Clement 421 0.0
10 0.98 Tony Zuniga 0 0.0
11 1.06 Ryan Garko 1,714 1.2
12 1.14 Robin Jennings 86 0.0
13 1.15 Carlos Quentin 2,432 7.2
14 1.24 Joe Hall 31 0.4
15 1.24 Blake DeWitt 1,247 1.9
16 1.27 Cord Phelps 126 0.0
17 1.30 Mitch Moreland 1,744 1.6
18 1.32 Trot Nixon 2,226 11.7
19 1.32 Craig Monroe 1,646 4.2
20 1.35 Jim Gallagher 0 0.0
21 1.42 Matt Stairs 299 0.5

*Batters who have yet to play their age-28 season.

And here’s a list containing only players who were primarily outfielders in Triple-A, just like Piscotty was.

Rank Mah Dist Name PA thru 28 WAR thru 28
1 0.34 Beau Allred 156 0.8
2 0.54 Jon Saffer 0 0.0
3 0.61 Bill Masse 0 0.0
4 0.83 Rob Ryan 70 0.0
5 1.14 Robin Jennings 86 0.0
6 1.15 Carlos Quentin 2,432 7.2
7 1.30 Mitch Moreland 1,744 1.6
8 1.32 Trot Nixon 2,226 11.7
9 1.32 Craig Monroe 1,646 4.2
10 1.42 Matt Stairs 299 0.5

*Batters who have yet to play their age-28 season.

As always, there are quite a few flops among Piscotty’s comps. But there are also some powerful hitters mixed in. Although they peaked rather early, Carlos Quentin, Trot Nixon and Craig Monroe were all productive corner outfielders for a time. Matt Stairs was too, although he didn’t really get a chance to play until his age-29 season. These players represent reasonable upsides for Piscotty, assuming his power sticks around.

On the defensive side of things, both the scouting reports and the data suggest that Piscotty’s more than adequate in an outfield corner. On the strength of his fringe-average speed and plus arm, he’s been 13 runs better than average according to Baseball Prospectus’ minor league FRAA numbers, with most of that coming from right field.

For now, however, Piscotty figures to play most of his games at first base, which is a very new position for him. Piscotty was a third baseman in college, where he also dabbled at first, but that was three years ago now. Since his pro debut in 2012, he’s played a total of six games at first, with all of them coming this year. So there might be a bit of a learning curve there. First base may be at the very low end of the defensive spectrum, but that doesn’t mean it’s an easy position to master, especially for someone with so little recent experience. Tell ’em, Wash.

Moneyball_0i273w63                                                              (Hat tip to MLB.com for the GIF)

There’s plenty to like about Piscotty’s game. He doesn’t strike out much, draws walks, and is finally starting to hit for power. As a corner bat, Piscotty will need to do a lot offensively to stick as a regular. But given his minor league track record, it appears he may have enough offensive talent to pull it off.

Steamer forecasts Piscotty for an 88 wRC+ from here on out, which would put him in the neighborhood of replacement level given his defensive limitations. This projection feels a tad low given Piscotty’s Triple-A numbers; but might still be an upgrade over the remains of Mark Reynolds. And if Piscotty’s newfound power proves to be real, he could easily be a league average — or better — hitter right away, giving the Cardinals could have yet another potent bat in their lineup.





Chris works in economic development by day, but spends most of his nights thinking about baseball. He writes for Pinstripe Pundits, FanGraphs and The Hardball Times. He's also on the twitter machine: @_chris_mitchell None of the views expressed in his articles reflect those of his daytime employer.

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jruby
Member
Member
jruby

I’m never going to hear the name Oscar Taveras and not get sad.

gibby
Guest
gibby

What about Edilia Arvelo, the woman Oscar Taveras killed driving drunk?

McNulty
Guest
McNulty

what about major world wars, mass shooting, brutal homicides, and other horrible events. You must reserve your emotions for those events!

anyways. Great! Another Craig Edwards Cardinals puff piece.

Paul
Guest
Paul

Jruby didn’t watch Edilia Arvelo play for his favorite team or dream about his future as a Vladimir Guerrero-type player. It doesn’t mean Edilia is less valuable as a person, but it doesn’t mean jruby didn’t know her on the same level as Oscar. One can be more sad for people who they know who have died more than some other person who’s died; it doesn’t mean that they don’t care about that other person or that the other person didn’t matter.

bpdelia
Guest
bpdelia

Yes. That is also sad. Sometimes i forget that people who make mistakes forfeit the right to any sympathy. Thanks for reminding me. For a second i considered the entire affair sad.

But now i can hide my sadness with righteous anger!

I feel much better.

Spa City
Member
Spa City

Driving while incredibly drunk (.287 BAC) is not a “mistake”. It is an incredibly selfish, reckless, despicable decision.

To reach a .287 BAC, Taveras must have enjoyed well over a dozen drinks. I doubt he “mistakenly” drank 15 beers, and I doubt he “mistakenly” decided to put the lives of everybody else on the road in severe danger.

If Oscar Taveras survived, he would be in prison for criminally negligent homicide (or whatever the DR’s equivalent statute, assuming one exists, would be). He killed that poor woman and put others at the same risk due to his selfish, reckless decisions.

It is a shame that people still speak highly of the piece of garbage… apparently just because he was good at playing baseball.

jruby
Member
Member
jruby

To be clear: I did not speak highly of Taveras. I said that when I read his name I’ll be sad. Oscar Taveras was a human being who had a whole life in front of him and threw it away. That’s sad. What’s even more sad was that he took someone else’s life in the process. I knew his passenger died, although I didn’t know her name. I’ll make a point to remember it.

But, seriously, let’s not go down this path. Oscar Taveras is a “piece of garbage?” Get off your freaking high horse. Is everyone who’s ever driven drunk a piece of garbage, or is it only the ones who crashed with a passenger in the car? What’s the BAC cut-off for “piece of garbage”?

Yeah, I’m not going to come on a baseball site and mourn every person who died by name. Again, when is one death sadder than another? Do we really want to play this game?

I didn’t mean to start an argument about this; all I did was saw Taveras’s name and remark simply that reading that name evokes sadness. Every time someone whose name we already know dies, it’s a reminder that every day thousands and thousands I people whose names we don’t know die as well. It’s a reminder that our decisions affect those around us, and a
bad decision can snuff out multiple lifetimes of opportunity. It’s sad that Oscar made a bad decision that cost his life and another’s. That’s all.

Mark L
Guest
Mark L

Does every single death in the world bother you equally?

GOD
Guest
GOD

yes.