Author Archive

Meg Rowley FanGraphs Chat – 2/12/19

2:00
Meg Rowley: Hello and welcome to the chat!

2:00
Meg Rowley: Allow me a brief moment to retrieve my coffee from the microwave.

2:00
Meg Rowley: Shall be back shortly.

2:02
Meg Rowley: I have returned. Many thanks for your collective patience.

2:03
Chris: Have the odds the Padres land Harper gone up or down since your last chat?

2:04
Meg Rowley: I suppose down slightly, though I still think I think that he ends up in Philly. I still think I think that.

Read the rest of this entry »


FanGraphs Audio: Mina Kimes Considers Kyler Murray’s Choices

Episode 854

ESPN the Magazine Senior Writer Mina Kimes joins the program direct from a Miami TV studio to react to the almost-breaking news that A’s prospect Kyler Murray will not play baseball and will, instead, focus on football. Mina offers her expert opinion of Murray’s current NFL draft stock and future potential NFL success, what his decision means for baseball, and her view of the offseason’s cold stove. Follow Mina on twitter, and be sure to check out her NFL podcast, The Mina Kimes Show featuring Lenny.

Don’t hesitate to direct pod-related correspondence to @megrowler on Twitter.

You can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or other feeder things.

Audio after the jump. (Approximate 31 min play time.)

Read the rest of this entry »


FanGraphs Audio: Kiley McDaniel Endeavors to Undersell Himself

Episode 853

Prospect analyst and resident bon vivant Kiley McDaniel joins the program to offer his take on the J.T. Realmuto trade, update the listening audience on his home renovations, briefly preview FanGraphs’ upcoming Prospect Week, and hear my review of Netflix’s Ted Bundy documentary.

You can find all of Kiley and Eric Longenhagen’s wonderful prospect coverage by visiting our dedicated prospects page, which can be found here.

Don’t hesitate to direct pod-related correspondence to @megrowler on Twitter.

You can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or other feeder things.

Audio after the jump. (Approximate 53 min play time.)

Read the rest of this entry »


Meg Rowley FanGraphs Chat – 2/5/19

2:00
Meg Rowley: Hello, friends.

2:00
Meg Rowley: Welcome to the chat!

2:01
Meg Rowley: Very little is happening in baseball. In Seattle, it is quite cold (for Seattle).

2:01
Bo: How much longer do you think the Harper and Machado sweepstakes last? Who signs first?

2:01
Meg Rowley: I still think Machado goes first.

2:02
Meg Rowley: In terms of when, I wonder if we’ll see them before the end of the month at this point.

Read the rest of this entry »


FanGraphs Audio: Dan Szymborski Contemplates Sibling Rivalry

Episode 852

FanGraphs writer and ZiPS creator Dan Szymborski returns to the program to discuss, among other things, which teams’ projections he expects to change the most before Opening Day, the destructive force that is sibling rivalry, and baseball’s very cold stove. Dan also offers his official account of the Great Winter Meetings Old Fashioneds Incident, and we explore my limited, and quite strange, personal exposure to video games.

You can find Dan’s 2019 ZiPS projections as they roll out on the FanGraphs homepage, or by clicking here.

Don’t hesitate to direct pod-related correspondence to @megrowler on Twitter.

You can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or other feeder things.

Audio after the jump. (Approximate 56 min play time.)

Read the rest of this entry »


FanGraphs is Hiring! Seeking Site Contributors

Update: The submission deadline for applications has been extended to Friday, February 8.

As the 2019 season approaches, I’m pleased to announce that FanGraphs is now accepting applications to join our staff as a contributing writer.

Contributors typically write three times a week. Familiarity and comfort with the data here on FanGraphs is a requirement, but just as importantly, we’re looking for writers who can generate their own ideas and questions while providing interesting analysis or commentary on the game of baseball. From free agent signings to statistical analysis, teams’ top prospects to in-game strategy, we endeavor to cover it all, highlights to lowlights. Sometimes we do that with a bit of silliness; other times, we’re more serious. But what all of our work has in common is a commitment to asking interesting questions and using rigor, creativity, and the latest analytical tools to find the answers for our readers.

This is a part-time, paid position. Prior writing experience is strongly preferred, though the bulk of that experience doesn’t necessarily have to be of the baseball variety. We know baseball analysis is more interesting and complete when diverse perspectives and voices are brought to bear on the questions and trends in today’s game, and encourage writers of all backgrounds and identities to apply. When applying, please include samples or links to work you’ve published previously, or some new, original content you feel best demonstrates your writing abilities and interests. You may also include a resume, but it is not required for the initial application. Please send us an email at wanted@fangraphs.com with your application materials, using the subject line “FanGraphs Writer Application – 2019.” The subject line is important, as it helps us keep all of the applications organized and ensures that yours does not slip through the cracks.

If for some reason you are unable to submit your application using the wanted@fangraphs.com e-mail address, simply fill out a contact form with the same subject (“FanGraphs Writer Application – 2019”), and you will be provided an alternate e-mail address for submission.

However you send us your application, please do so by Friday, February 8.

If you feel like you’d be a good fit as a contributing writer for FanGraphs, please drop us a line. We cannot promise to respond to every application we receive, but we’ll make sure every applicant receives serious consideration.

We look forward to hearing from you.


2019 SABR Analytics Awards: Voting Now Open!

Here’s your chance to vote for the 2019 SABR Analytics Conference Research Award winners.

The SABR Analytics Conference Research Awards will recognize baseball researchers who have completed the best work of original analysis or commentary during the preceding calendar year. Nominations were solicited by representatives from SABR, Baseball Prospectus, FanGraphs, The Hardball Times, and Beyond the Box Score.

To read any of the finalists, click on the link below. Scroll down to cast your vote.

Contemporary Baseball Analysis

Contemporary Baseball Commentary

Historical Analysis/Commentary

Voting will be open through 11:59 p.m. MST on Monday, February 11, 2019. Details and criteria for each category can be found here. Only one work per author was considered as a finalist.

 

 

Create your own user feedback survey

Mobile or Safari users, click here to access the survey

 

Results will be announced and presented at the eighth annual SABR Analytics Conference, March 8-10, 2019, at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix in Phoenix, Arizona. Learn more or register for the conference at SABR.org/analytics.


Meg Rowley FanGraphs Chat – 1/29/19

2:00
Meg Rowley: Hello, and welcome to the chat!

2:00
Well-Beered Englishman: If every team in the MLB offered you identical $300M contracts, which team/city would you choose, and why?

2:02
Meg Rowley: The following represents a list of places I personally would not mind living. It is not a list meant to denigrate any other city, or your preferences for them. But:

2:03
Meg Rowley: 1) Seattle 2) Denver 3) San Diego 4) Phoenix

2:03
Gaslamp Gary: How much of an upgrade at 3B would Moustaksa be compared to Machado? I  mean, either one would be an obvious upgrade. But is Mous THAT much worse, considering the price?

2:06
Meg Rowley: These projections are early (they don’t yet fold in ZiPS) but Machado is projected for 5.1 wins; Moustakas is projected for 2.7. Kiley’s estimated AAV for Machado was $31 million; Moustakas was $22. Granted, that deal would be much shorter, but you know who would be a really big help on a very good, young Padres team? Manny Machado.

Read the rest of this entry »


FanGraphs Audio: Patrick Dubuque, Baseball Philosopher King

Episode 851

Baseball Prospectus’ Director of Editorial Content, and newly minted SABR Award Finalist, Patrick Dubuque joins the program to discuss ethics in baseball transaction journalism, what we might and ought to expect from baseball ownership, and various ills plaguing today’s game. We also share a few editorial pet peeves. Oh, editor talk.

Don’t hesitate to direct pod-related correspondence to @megrowler on Twitter.

You can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or other feeder things.

Audio after the jump. (Approximate 1 hour play time.)

Read the rest of this entry »


A Brief Note on Edgar Martinez, Hall of Famer

Edgar Martinez sits at the center of my first really clear baseball memory. I have others, hazier ones, with moments that snap into more specific relief. I remember walking up the ramps of the Kingdome. I remember the brief moment of chill you’d experience when you entered its concrete chasm, separated suddenly from Seattle’s July warmth. I remember baseball guys doing baseball things, but which guys and what things are lost. Liking baseball, loving it, has persisted, but I don’t remember specific home runs any more than particular days of kindergarten, even though I still know how to read.

I have a hard time sussing out what of the rest of Game 5 of the 1995 ALDS is real memory and what is the result of having rewatched it, over and over and over, when I was in need of a good thing to hold on to. I do not feel confident that my impressions of Randy Johnson in relief, entering as he did to “Welcome to the Jungle,” are borne of the moment; nine-year-old me would not know to smirk at how much of his warmup was broadcast, would not have thought the hairstyles of those in the crowd funny. That’s what hair looked like in 1995.

But The Double is there. The Double I know. The Double I remember back through the years and into the corners of my living room. I recall the moment before the pitch was delivered. I remember my step-mom nervously fidgeting with the stakes of the moment and the gnawing concern about how long the game might go, how close to bedtime it would stretch. I remember yipping for joy, in that high-pitched way that kids have, annoying but pure. I remember, even if I didn’t yet quite have the vocabulary to talk about obsession and yearning, thinking, “Oh, I have to do this again.” I remember believing that Edgar Martinez was great. (I do not recall a single pitch of the Mariners loss to the Indians in the ALCS. Sometimes our memories spare us.)

I think much of baseball’s fastidious statistical chronicling is attributable to a native curiosity, a desire to be able to answer how this thing over here relates to that thing over there, even when the this and that are separated by generations. But I think a not-small part of our motivation to catalogue lies in an anxiety over the state of our own memories, whether we’re still sharp. We don’t just seek to make sure the deserving are immortalized; we seek to trust our own mortal lives, to know that we know things as they were. That we are reliable narrators. That the moments around which I built my fandom and my professional life, the root of this thing I sometimes recall more carefully than the details of my own biography, is as I thought it to be. That something so foundational need not be met with the same disquieting sensation I experience when I can recall what the third reliever on the Reds’ depth chart looks like, but for a moment, can’t muster up his name.

Edgar Martinez was a Hall of Famer, only for a long time he wasn’t one. And you start to wonder in those moments, despite knowing so many who agree with you, whether we haven’t all gotten it wrong, whether we aren’t a little less smart than we thought. Whether he was great.

And so I think it helps us to feel complete when we are affirmed in this way. We feel our memories and lives rich with detail, our mental pictures not only accurately rendered but placed in their proper context. Perhaps it takes me a beat longer than it used to to recall a player’s name from 1995, but this thing I know. I used to, as a very young person, think that Dan Wilson was a Hall of Famer. I was tiny and dumb and enamored with catchers, and there he was, our catcher and so the best catcher. But he was not the best. To Cooperstown he could only credibly go as a visitor, a witness to his friends’ greatness. I didn’t know what it meant to be great in any sort of a rigorous way back then; good childhoods aren’t often marked by an excess of rigor. I didn’t know. Except maybe on occasion I did.

After all, Edgar Martinez is a Hall of Famer, just like I remember him.